Indiana University
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Rebecca S. Martínez Profile Image

Rebecca S. Martínez

Associate Professor
Faculty
W.W. Wright Education Building Room Education Building
Phone : (812) 856-8324
Fax: (812) 856-8333
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Department:  Counseling and Educational Psychology
Affiliations:  School Psychology
My website:  http://portal.education.indiana.edu/awcp/AWCP/tabid/14053/Default.aspx
 
About Me | Degrees | Publications
 

ABOUT ME

Rebecca S. Martinez is an associate professor in the School Psychology Program at Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana. A native Spanish speaker, she was raised in Mexico City, Mexico, where she attended elementary school through the third grade.

After graduating with a B.S. in Psychology from the University of Florida, Rebecca joined Teach for America and became a migrant education/bilingual education teacher in the Rio Grande Valley on the Texas-Mexico border (see her school here!). While in Pharr, Texas, she taught fourth grade, third grade and prekindergarten; she has lifetime Texas teaching licenses in bilingual education and early childhood education. In 1996, Rebecca was accepted into the School Psychology Program at the University of Texas at Austin, where she earned her M.S. in Program Evaluation and Ph.D. in School Psychology. During graduate school, she taught first grade and volunteered as a Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA). Rebecca completed her pre-doctoral internship in the Cypress-Fairbanks Independent School District in Houston, Texas.

Rebecca joined the School Psychology faculty at Indiana University in 2003 and earned tenure in 2009. In 2004, she created the Academic Well-Check Program (AWCP), which is a collaborative partnership with a local school district (RBBCSC) that allows her to conduct empirical research in the public schools and has afforded her graduate students the opportunity to gain applied experiences that bridge the research-to practice-gap in education and school psychology. Rebecca describes her research agenda as “a public health model for the prevention and early intervention of children’s academic failure” that “focuses on researching effective scientifically-based educational practices that promote children’s academic success.” She has been a very active scholar since 2003, publishing 29 manuscripts (including 14 peer-reviewed empirical articles) and obtaining over $400,000 in university and state funding.

               At the national level, Rebecca is on the Editorial Boards for the Journal of School Psychology and Assessment for Effective Intervention and was on the Editorial Board of Psychology in the Schools between 2006-2009. She is an ad hoc reviewer for School Psychology Review.  In 2011, she was honored with the Reviewer of the Year Award from the Journal of School Psychology. Also in 2011, she was Chair of the School Psychology Research Collaboration Conference, which brings together early and late career scholars to collaborate on scholarly endeavors. Rebecca is on the National Association of School Psychologists’ Child and Professions Committee (which reviews NASP’s Position Statements).

               At the state level, Rebecca has been appointed to the State Literacy Team and The Reading Advisory Council. She also co-developed the Summer Academy for School Psychologists (SASP), which offered in-service training in Response to Intervention to school psychology practitioners from 2006-2009. Rebecca consults regularly with the Indiana Department of Education and works with schools directly in their efforts to implement Response to Intervention and other best practices, especially with regard to English learners. In 2007, the Bloomington Chamber of Commerce recognized the Academic Well-Check Program and awarded Rebecca the Leading Light Award. In 2009, she received the Excellence in Graduate Mentoring Award from the IU School of Education. Furthermore, Rebecca has been involved as a Board Member and Advisory Board Member of the Children's Organ Transplant Association since 2005.

               Rebecca’s work in the coming years will continue the line of inquiry focused on the prevention and intervention of children’s academic failure. She is deeply committed to improving educational practices for students who are failing or at risk of failing academically and takes very seriously her role in preparing future practitioners who will carry on the important task of ensuring educational parity and success for all K-12 students.

Publications (Highlighted names are current or former IU students, Bold names are community partners)

 

Book Slated for Publication in 2014

 

                  Albers, C.A., & Martínez, R. S. (in progress). Academic Success in English: Using Response to Intervention as Best Practice for English Language Learners. Guilford Publications: New York, NY.

 

Published in  2014 (or in press)

 

Martínez, R.S., & Butera, G. (Guest Co-Editors) (in press). Multidisciplinary Collaboration to Support Struggling Readers. Special series for Journal of Educational and Psychological Consultation.

Martinez, R. S., Harris, B., & McClain, M. (in press). Effective and Collaborative School Practices that Promote English Reading for English Learners (EL). Journal of Educational and Psychological Consultation.

 

Martinez, S., Martinez, R.S., & McClain, M.B. (in press). Culturally responsive self-efficacy among teachers of English language learners in the rural Midwest?: One school’s story. Journal of Latino-Latin American Studies.

Published in 2013

McIntosh, K., Martinez,R.S., Ty, S.V., McClain, M.B. (2013). Scientific research in school psychology: Leading researchers weigh in on our past, present, and future. Journal of School Psychology, 51, 267-318.

Published in 2012

  Missall, K., Mercer, S., Martínez, R. S., & Casebeer, D. (2012). Concurrent and Predictive Patterns and Trends in Performance on Early Numeracy Curriculum-Based Measures in Kindergarten and First Grade. Assessment for Effective Intervention, 37(2), 95-106.

 

                  Martínez, R. S., Nellis, L. N., White, S., & Jochim, M. (2012). Learning and cognitive disorders of childhood and adolescence. In Maddux, J. & Winstead, B. (Eds.) Psychopathology: Foundations for a Contemporary Understanding (3rd Ed.). New York, NY: Routledge.

 

                  Mercer, S., Martínez, R. S., & Faust, D., & Mitchell, R. R. (2012). Criterion-Related Validity of Writing Curriculum-Based Measurement (WCBM) in High School Students, School Psychology Quarterly, 27(2), 85-95.

 

                  Cummings, J. A., & Martínez, R. S. (2012). Visual representation of data: Showing the effects of intervention. In R. Brown-Chidsey & Andren, K. (Eds.) Problem-Solving Based Assessment for Educational Intervention Second Edition. New York, NY: Guildford Publications.

 

                  Begeny, J., Yeager, A., & Martínez, R. S. (2012). Effects of small-group and one-on-one reading fluency interventions with second grade, low-performing Spanish readers. Journal of Behavioral Education, 21(1), 58-79.

 

Published in 2011 

 

Martínez, R. S., Floyd, R. & Erichsen, L. (2011). Strategies and attributes of highly productive contributors to the school psychology literature. Journal of School Psychology, 49, 691-720.

 

Albers, C. A., Floyd, R. G., Fuhrmann, M. J., & Martínez, R. S. (2011). Publication criteria and recommended areas of improvement within school psychology journals as reported by editors, journal board members, and manuscript authors. Journal of School Psychology, 49, 669-689.

 

Martínez, R.S., Aricak, T., Graves, M.N., Peters, J., & Nellis, L. (2011). Changes in perceived social support and socioemotional adjustment across the elementary to middle school transition. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 40, 519-530.

 

Mercer, S., Nellis, L., Martínez, R. S., Kirk, M. (2011). Supporting the students most in need: Academic self-efficacy and teacher support as predictors of academic skill growth. Journal of School Psychology, 49, 323-338.

 

Published in 2010

Martinez, R. S., & Hazel, C. (2010). Entry level issues in school psychology. Trainers’ Forum, 29(2), 9-10.

Daly, E. J., Hofstadter, K. I., Martinez, R. S., & Andersen, M. (2010). Selecting Academic Interventions for Individual Students. In G. G. Peacock, R. Ervin, & Daly, E. J. (Eds.) Practical Handbook of School Psychology: Effective Practices for the 21st Century (pp. 115-132). New York, NY: Guilford Publications.

Martínez, R.S., & Huberty, T. (2010). Anxiety in Students with Learning Difficulties and Learning Disabilities. In J. Cassady (Ed.). Anxiety in schools: The causes, consequences, and solutions for academic anxieties (pp.137-152). New York, NY: Peter Lang Publishing.

Published in 2009

Martínez, R.S., Missall, K. M., Graney, S. B., K. Aricak, T., & Clarke, B. (2009). Technical adequacy of early numeracy curriculum-based measurement in kindergarten. Assessment for Effective Intervention, 34(2), 116-125.

Harris, B., Plucker, J. A., Rapp, K. E., & Martínez, R.S. (2009). Identifying gifted and talented English language learners: A case study. Journal for the Education of the Gifted, 32, 368–393.

Graney, S. B., Martínez, R.S., Missall, K., & Aricak, T. (2009). Universal screening of reading in late elementary school: R-CBM versus CBM Maze. Remedial and Special Education, 31(5), 368-377.

Graney, S. B., Missall, K., Martínez, R. S., & Bergstrom, M. (2009). A preliminary investigation of within-year growthpatterns in reading and mathematicscurriculum-based measures. Journal of School Psychology, 47(2), 121-142.

Edl, H., Humphreys, L., & Martínez, R. S. (2009). University-School Collaboration for the Implementation of a Tier III Reading Program for Elementary School Students. Journal of Applied School Psychology, 25(3), 221-243.

Published in 2008

Martínez, R.S., Aricak, T., & Jewell, J. (2008). Influence of reading attitude on reading achievement: A test of the temporal-interaction model. Psychology in the Schools, 45, 1010-1022.

Aricak, T., Bekci, B., Siyahhan, S., & Martínez, R.S. (2008). Turkish elementary school students’ perceptions of local and global terrorism. Electronic Journal of Research in Educational Psychology, 6, 117-134.

Palacios, E. D., Martínez, R.S., & Ridley, C.R. (2008). Bilingual school psychologists. In C. S. Clauss-Ehlers (Ed.). The Encyclopedia of Cross Cultural School Psychology. New York, NY: Springer Publishing.

Martínez, R. S., & Nellis, L. (2008). A School-Wide Approach for Promoting Academic Wellness for All Students. In B. Doll & J. Cummings (Eds.). Transforming school mental health services (pp.143-164). Thousand Oaks, California: Corwin Press.

Nellis, L. M., & Martínez, R. S. (2008). Indiana summer academy for school psychologists: A response to professional development needs around tiered models of prevention and intervention. Trainers’ Forum, 26, 14-17.

Pérez, B., Harris, B., Martínez, R.S., & Ridley, C.R. (2008). Culturally competent assessment of English language learners. In Clauss-Ehlers, Caroline S. (Ed.). The Encyclopedia of Cross Cultural School Psychology. New York, NY: Springer Publishing.

Martínez, R. S., Graves, M. N., & Heckman, A. R. (2008). School-university partnerships: Marshalling local resources for RTI implementation. Communiqué, 36.

Graves, M.N., & Martínez, R.S. (2008). A comprehensive look at learning disabilities. In C.S. Clauss-Ehlers (Ed.), Encyclopedia of cross-cultural school psychology. New York: Springer.

Published in 2007

Harris, B., Rapp, K.E., Martínez, R.S., Plucker, J. A. (2007). Identifying English language learners for gifted and talented programs: Current practices and recommendations for improvement. Roeper Review, 30, 26-29.

Levinson, B., Bucher, K., Harvey, L., Martínez, R.S., Perez, B., Skiba, R., Harris, B., Cowan, P., & Chung, C. (2007, August). Latino Language Minority Students in Indiana: Trends, Conditions, and Challenges. Bloomington, IN: Center for Evaluation and Education Policy.

Published in 2006

Martínez, R.S., & Carspecken, P. (2006). Effectiveness of children’s literature and discussion to promote the social acceptance of peers with disabilities in a sample of Latino elementary children. The Journal of Applied School Psychology, 23, 97-115.

Martínez, R. S. (2006). Social support in inclusive middle schools: Perceptions of youth with learning disabilities. Psychology in the Schools, 43, 197-209.

Martínez, R.S., & Humphreys, L. (2006). Providing reasonable academic accommodations for secondary students with documented disabilities. Principal Leadership, 12-15.

Martínez, R.S., Nellis, L.M., & Prendergast, K. (2006, September 18). Closing the Achievement Gap Series, Part II: Response to Intervention (RTI) – Basic Elements, Practical Applications, and Policy Recommendations. Bloomington, IN: Center for Evaluation and Education Policy.

Hopf, A., & Martínez, R.S. (2006). Implementation of Instructional Level Assessment (ILA) within a Response to Intervention (RTI) model of service delivery. The School Psychologist, 60, 75-78.

Graves, M., & Martínez, R.S. (2006, December). Changes in IDEA 2004: Highlighting what school psychologists ought to know. Indiana Association of School Psychologists (IASP) Newsletter.

Published in 2005

Martínez, R.S., & Dick, A. C. (2005). Inclusion of children with disabilities in regular classroom settings. In Salkind, Neil J. (2005) (Ed.). Encyclopedia of Human Development. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Delgado-Romero, E.A., Barfield, J., Fairley, B., & Martínez, R.S. (2005). Using the multicultural guidelines in individual and group counseling situations. In M. Constantine & D. W. Sue (Eds.), Strategies for building cultural competence in mental health and educational settings (pp. 39-55). Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons.

Plucker, J., Martínez, R.S., Harris, B., & Rapp, K. (2005). Identification of Students who are Limited English Proficient as Gifted. Bloomington, Indiana: Center for Evaluation and Education Policy.

Published in 2004

Martínez, R.S., & Semrud-Clikeman, M. (2004). Psychosocial functioning of young adolescents with multiple versus single learning disabilities. Journal of Learning Disabilities, 37, 411-420.

Martínez, R.S. (2004). Psychosocial problems and learning disability type: A fruitful area for future research in school psychology. The School Psychologist, 58, 62-64.

Martínez, R.S. (2004). General education teachers’ attitudes toward inclusion: Implications for school psychologists. Communiqué, 33, 16-18.

Published in 2003 and earlier

Martínez, R.S. (2003). Impact of a graduate class on attitudes toward inclusion, perceived teaching efficacy, and knowledge about adapting instruction for children with disabilities in inclusive settings. Teacher Development, 7, 395-416.

Crandall, C. & Martínez, R.S. (1996). Culture, ideology, and anti-fat attitudes. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 22, 1165-1176.

 

 

DEGREES

2002 Ph.D. University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, School Psychology 

2001 M.S. University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, Program Evaluation

1993 B.S. University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, Psychology, Summa cum Laude

 

PUBLICATIONS
  • Martnez, R.S., Butera, G. (Guest Co-Editors) (2014). Multidisciplinary Collaboration to Support Struggling Readers. Special series for Journal of Educational and Psychological Consultation.
  • Martinez, R. S., Harris, B., McClain, M. (2014). Effective and Collaborative School Practices that Promote English Reading for English Learners (EL). Journal of Educational and Psychological Consultation.
  • Martinez, R. S. (2014). Best Practices in Instructional Strategies for Reading in General Education. In A. Thomas Harrison, P. (Eds.). Best Practices in School Psychology (6th Ed.). National Association of School Psychologists.
  • Albers, C.A., Martnez, R. S. (accepted). Academic Success in English: Using Response to Intervention as Best Practice for English Language Learners. Guilford Publications: New York, NY.
  • Martinez, S., Martinez, R.S., McClain, M.B. (accepted). Culturally responsive self-efficacy among teachers of English language learners in the rural Midwest": One schools story. Journal of Latino-Latin American Studies.
  • Cummings, J. A., Martnez, R. S. (2013). Visual representation of data: Showing the effects of intervention. In R. Brown-Chidsey Andren, K. (Eds.) Problem-Solving Based Assessment for Educational Intervention Second Edition. New York, NY: Guildford Publications.
  • McIntosh,K., Martinez,R.S., Ty, S.V., McClain, M.B.(2013).Scientific research in school psychology: Leading researchers weigh in onour past, present, and future. Journalof School Psychology, 51, 267-318.A survey of established researchers in school psychology was conducted to reflect on the stateof the science of school psychology research. A total of 54 members of the Society for the Studyof School Psychology shared their perceptions of (a) the most significant findings of the past25 years that have influenced research and practice in school psychology, (b) current, excitingresearch topics, and (c) topics that are likely to guide the future of research in schoolpsychology. Qualitative analyses revealed 6 major categories and 17 minor categories withinthe major categories. Four major categories were present across each of the three time periods:(a) Data-Informed Practices and their Implementation, (b) Theory Development, (c) ChangingRole and Function, and (d) Biological Bases of Behavior. Additional major categories includedAdvances in Research Methodology and Psychometrics (found across past and present timeperiods) and There is Not One Single Most Important Idea (found during only the past timeperiod). Quotations are provided to illustrate these categories and share the respondents ideasin their own words.
  • Begeny, J., Yeager, A., Martnez, R. S. (2012). Effects of small-group and one-on-one reading fluency interventions with second grade, low-performing Spanish readers. Journal of Behavioral Education, 21(1), 58-79.
  • Missall, K., Mercer, S., Martnez, R. S., Casebeer, D. (2012). Concurrent and Predictive Patterns and Trends in Performance on Early Numeracy Curriculum-Based Measures in Kindergarten and First Grade. Assessment for Effective Intervention, 37(2), 95-106.
  • Martnez, R. S., Nellis, L. N., White, S., Jochim, M. (2012). Learning and cognitive disorders of childhood and adolescence. In Maddux, J. Winstead, B. (Eds.) Psychopathology: Foundations for a Contemporary Understanding (3rd Ed.). New York, NY: Routledge.
  • Mercer, S., Martnez, R. S., Faust, D., Mitchell, R. R. (2012). Criterion-Related Validity of Writing Curriculum-Based Measurement (WCBM) in High School Students, School Psychology Quarterly, 27(2), 85-95.
  • Cummings, J. A., Martnez, R. S. (2012). Visual representation of data: Showing the effects of intervention. In R. Brown-Chidsey Andren, K. (Eds.) Problem-Solving Based Assessment for Educational Intervention Second Edition. New York, NY: Guildford Publications.
  • Martnez, R.S., Aricak, T., Graves, M.N., Peters, J., Nellis, L. (2011). Changes in perceived social support and socioemotional adjustment across the elementary to middle school transition. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 40, 519-530.The current study explored changes in and relationships among perceived social support (SS) and socioemotional adjustment (SEA) across the 1-year transition from elementary to junior high school. Two cohorts of students (N = 140) participated in the current study that took place across a 3-year time span. Analyses of the transition data for boys and girls together reveal declines in perceived total support and teacher support as well as an increase in self-reported school problems. When considering the sexes separately, girls perceived total support, close friend support and school support declined while boys self-reported school problems increased across the transition. Although social support did not emerge as a mediator or predictor for any of the socioemotional variables in the current study, results reveal that, in general, perceived social support and socioemotional functioning at the end of the last year of elementary school predictsperceived social support and socioemotional functioning at the end of the first year of junior high school. Study limitations and implications for research and practice are discussed.
  • Martnez, R. S., Nellis, L. N.,White, S., Jochim, M. (2012). Learning and cognitive disorders of childhood and adolescence. In Maddux, J. Winstead, B. (Eds.)Psychopathology: Foundations for a Contemporary Understanding (3rd Ed.). New York, NY: Routledge.The current chapter focuses on the three most ubiquitous learning disorders: specific learning disabilities (SLD), speech or language impairments (SLI), and intellectual disabilities (ID). The chapter provices the reader with specific strategies to help clients with learning disorders and their families navigate the school system, particularly within special education. We also provide suggestions for clinical psychologists and social workers who desire to work closely with staff at their clients school. Specifically, we recommend ways clinicians can: (a) promote prevention of learning failure, (b) participate in school wide efforts to support children and adolescents with learning disorders, and (c) partner effectively with parents and schools to improve the schooling experience of students with learning disorders.
  • Mercer, S., Nellis, L., Martnez, R. S., Kirk, M. (2011). Supporting the students most in need: Academic self-efficacy and teacher support as predictors of academic skill growth. Journal of School Psychology, 49, 323-338.Participants included 193 5th-grade students. Teachers collected curriculum-based measures (CBM) of reading and math on three occasions as part of routine academic benchmarks, and researchers collected student-reported measures of academic self-efficacy and perceived teacher support in the spring of the same academic year. Results indicated that academic self-efficacy was positively related to fall reading and math CBM scores and that perceived teacher support was unrelated to fall scores or growth across the academic year. Academic selfefficacy and perceived teacher support interacted in relation to math CBM growth such that low levels of perceived teacher support were related to greater growth, particularly for students with high academic self-efficacy. Follow-up analyses indicated that students with the lowest fall CBMscores and smallest growth rates reported higher levels of perceived teacher support, suggesting that teachers support the students most in need.
  • Missall, K., Mercer, S., Martinez, R. S., Casebeer, D. (in press). Concurrent and Predictive Patterns and Trends in Performance on Early Numeracy Curriculum-Based Measures in Kindergarten and First Grade. Assessment for Effective Intervention, X, XXX-XXX.This study extended the research on the Tests of Early Numeracy Curriculum-Based Measurement (TEN-CBM) tools by examining concurrent and predictive relations from kindergarten through third grade. We included logistic regression, latent cluster, and latent transition analyses to examine the patterns and trends of student performance on all four TEN-CBM measures in kindergarten and first grade. Results suggest that two of the TEN-CBM tools, Quantity Discrimination and Missing Number, are most robust at predicting later math performance. Longitudinal analysis indicated that students who are low performing in early numeracy at the beginning of kindergarten tend to be low performing in math at third grade.
  • Martnez, R. S., Floyd, R. Erichsen, L. (in press). Strategies and attributes of highly productive contributors to the school psychology literature. Journal of School Psychology.The goal of the current study was to discover what school psychology researchers with remarkably high levels of journal publication do to be so productive. In Study 1, 94 highly productive school psychology scholars were identified from past research, and 51 (39 men, 12 women) submitted individual, short-answer responses to a 5-item questionnaire regarding their research strategies. A constant comparative approach was employed to sort and code individual sentiments (N=479) into categories. Seven broad categories of counsel for increasing productivity emerged: (a) research and publication practices and strategies, (b) collaboration, mentoring and building relationships, (c) navigating the peer-review process, (d) strategies to bolster writing productivity and excellence, (e) personal character traits that foster productivity, (f) preparation before entering the professoriate, and (g) other noteworthy sentiments. Results are discussed in terms of nine recommendations for scholars and graduate students who wish to increase their productivity. In Study 2, five of the most productive scholars (1 woman, 4 men) participated in a semi-structured interview about their high levels of productivity. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed, and a case analysis approach employed to profile each scholar. Study limitations and suggestions for future research are discussed.
  • Begeny, J., Yeager, A., Martnez, R. S. (2011). Effects of small-group and one-on-one reading fluency interventions with second grade, low-performing Spanish readers. Journal of Behavioral Education, 1-22, 1-22.DOI:10.1007/s10864-011-9141-xThis study compared childrens Spanish reading performance across two reading intervention conditions: small group (SG) versus individual (teacher-student). Six second-grade Costa Rican students with low Spanish reading ability participated in the study. An alternating-treatments experimental design was used to compare the relative effectiveness of the two interventions to each other and to a no-intervention control condition. Results showed that nearly all students benefitted from one or both of the reading interventions. Findings are consistent with previous research with English readers and suggest that delivering fluency-based reading interventions with fidelity (such as those described in the current study) to Spanish readers may be an effective way to improve Spanish-speaking students reading skills. Results are also consistent with past research on the comparable effectiveness of delivering a reading fluency intervention to a small group versus an individual. Implications of these findings are discussed in terms of relative efficiency in the delivery of reading fluency interventions and with respect to educators in and out of the US who work with students struggling with Spanish reading fluency.
  • Albers, C. A., Floyd, R. G., Fuhrmann, M. J., Martinez, R. S. (in press). Publication criteria and recommended areas of improvement within school psychology journals as reported by editors, journal board members, and manuscript authors. Journal of School Psychology, 49.Two online surveys were completed by editors, associate editors, editorial board members, and members or fellows of the Division 16 of the American Psychological Association. These surveys targeted (a) the criteria for a manuscript to be published in school psychology journals, and (b) the components of the peer-review process that should be improved. Although prior surveys have targeted these issues in general, none have been conducted in school psychology or examined differences in perspectives between those who serve in a reviewing capacity or those who have served only in an author capacity. Results identified the most important characteristics for a manuscript submitted for publication to be positively reviewed as well as identified differences in the expectations for such characteristics between novice authors (who do not contribute to the journal editorial process) and those authors who serve the journal editorial processmore extensively (e.g., editors and associate editors). In addition, key areas to target for improvement (e.g., reducing potential reviewer bias)within the reviewing processwere identified.
  • Martnez, R.S., Aricak, T., Graves, M.N., Peters, J., Nellis, L. (2010). Changes in perceived social support and socioemotional adjustment across the elementary to middle school transition. Journal of Youth and Adolescence.This paper describes a longitudinal study of differences in individual perceptions of social support (SS) and socioemotional adjustment (SEA) across the elementary to middle school transition. Data for two cohorts of participants were collected across three school years when the participants were in fifth grade and again when they were in sixth grade. Results showed that for boys and girls together, perceived total social support and teacher support declined while internalizing problems increased across the one-year transition to middle school. Specifically, when boys and girls were compared, there was no evidence of a significant decline in any of the variables for boys. However, girls perceived total social support, close friend support, and school support declined significantly while girls school problems and internalizing problems increased from fifth to sixth grades. Further, perceived teacher support in fifth grade predicted lower school problems, lower internalizing problems and higher personal adjustment in sixth grade while higher fifth grade parent support predicted lower scores on the emotional symptom index one year later. These findings are discussed within the context of enhancing supportive relationships before, during and after the transition to middle school.
  • Daly, E. J., Hofstadter, K. I., Martinez, R. S., Andersen, M. (2010). Selecting Academic Interventions for Individual Students. In G. G. Peacock, R. Ervin, Daly, E. J. (Eds.) Practical Handbook of School Psychology: Effective Practices for the 21st Century (pp. 115-132). New York, NY: Guilford Publications. The focus of the chapter is on explaining and demonstrating the use of three principles for structuring strategically selected interventions within a framework for RtI and systematic problem solving.
  • Martinez, R. S., Hazel, C. (2010). Entry level issues in school psychology. Trainers Forum, 29(2), 9-10.On March 1-2, 2010, a team of eight dedicated school psychology trainers, students and practitioners met to discuss Entry Level Issues in School Psychology. Entry Level Issues was one of seven strands around which participants met as part of the National Conference on Contemporary Issues in School Psychology Education Training held at Loyola University. Each teams charge was to identify critical issues around their topic or strand, including those that facilitate and inhibit change, and develop a plan of action and white paper for distribution. This white paper summarizes our time together and plans for next steps to better understanding Entry Level Issues in school psychology. First, we list the nine entry-level issues identified as the team during the initial brainstorming session as being most critical entry-level issues. Following identification of core entry-level issues, the team articulated four critical dispositions of the entry-level school psychologist, which are described below. Third, the team agreed on an overall project objective and articulated an action plan for next steps as we move forward in understanding entry-level issues in school psychology.
  • Martnez, R.S., Huberty, T. (2010). Anxiety in Students with Learning Difficulties and Learning Disabilities. In J. Cassady (Ed.). Anxiety in schools: The causes, consequences, and solutions for academic anxieties (pp. 137-152). New York, NY: Peter Lang Publishing.The purpose of this chapter is to discuss anxiety in the special population that includes students who are at-risk for academic failure and students with identified learning disabilities. We begin with a review of the etiology, prevalence and treatment of anxiety disorders. Next, we examine childrens learning problems giving emphasis to a discussion of learning disabilities. Finally, we discuss Response to Intervention (RTI), a framework rooted in the public health model that is gaining widespread recognition and extensive implementation in public schools as one of the most promising and effective methods for the universal prevention and early intervention of childrens academic, behavioral and emotional problems.
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